#BlogTour #GuestPost Ill Will by Michael Stewart

ill willI’m so excited about Ill Will, hot off the presses from Harper Collins, and even more so about hosting a guest post by author Michael Stewart!

Ill Will tells the untold story of Heathcliff, unquestionably one of the most viscerally well drawn characters in English literature. I was named after Wuthering Heights, and was obsessed with Bronte’s masterpiece from the first time I read it – it is a volcano of a book which erupts off the page.  Yet I have always been left to wonder what happens in the 3.5 years between abused and degraded Heathcliff fleeing Wuthering Heights, after overhearing his beloved Cathy saying it would degrade her to marry him, and his triumphant return as a wealthy gentleman. Ill Will resolves that mystery… and although this is a stand-alone story that doesn’t require any previous knowledge of Heathcliff, I am sure Wuthering Heights enthusiasts will find this book doubly enjoyable.

‘I am William Lee: brute; liar, and graveside thief. But you will know me by another name’

I don’t want to give too much away, so I will only tell you what the blurb does – Heathcliff has left Wuthering Heights, and is travelling across the moors to Liverpool in search of his past. Along the way, he saves Emily, the foul-mouthed daughter of a Highwayman, from a whipping, and the pair journey on together. Roaming from graveyard to graveyard, making a living from Emily’s apparent ability to commune with the dead, the pair lie, cheat and scheme their way across the North of England. And towards the terrible misdeeds and untold riches that will one day send Heathcliff home to Wuthering Heights…

Michael-Stewart-e1511351217390Ill Will author Michael Stewart is a multi-award winning writer who has written several full length stage plays. His debut novel, King Crow, won the Guardian’s Not-the-Booker Award and has been selected as a recommended read for World Book Night. I’m delighted he agreed to write a blog post for us to tell us more about Heathcliff and his inspiration for Ill Will. Over to Michael!

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Emily Brontë, like her famous sisters, Charlotte and Anne, was a product of a home education. Her father, Patrick, made the decision to take Emily (and Charlotte) out of school after the death of her two older siblings, Maria and Elizabeth, who both died of tuberculosis within a few months of each other, after suffering hunger, cold and privation at Cowan Bridge School. Patrick was a progressive thinker. Born in poverty in Ireland, but gaining a scholarship to Cambridge, his was a rags to riches story. But his social conscience never left him. Perhaps because of this, he allowed Emily (and her sisters) access to reading that was deemed inappropriate for girls at the time. Writers such as Shelley, Walter Scott and Lord Byron. Continue reading “#BlogTour #GuestPost Ill Will by Michael Stewart”

#BlogTour #BookReview: Twice the Speed of Dark – Lulu Allison

TTSOD_FINALToday I am delighted to be part of the blog tour for Lulu Allison’s debut novel Twice the Speed of Dark, which was published last week. I primarily read for my own enjoyment and receive many review requests that I turn down as they just do not grab me – however after I read one small excerpt of Twice the Speed of Dark I was hooked, and had to read the rest. This thoughtful, lyrical novel, in which a mother and daughter separated by fatal violence circle each other, still bound by love, will stay with you long after you have closed the pages.

The story follows Caitlin, killed by a violent boyfriend, who slowly unfurls her story from beyond the grave. As Caitlin pieces together what happened to her, and the slow erosion of herself in an abusive relationship that culminated in her death, she pieces herself back together. Meanwhile her mother, Anna, is tormented by visceral grief. As she experiences the intensity of her individual loss, Anna could not believe how little interest the world took in the death of her only child. She becomes dismayed by the indifference she sees in news reports of victims of distant wars and acts of terror, seeing echoes of her daughter in all of the unnamed dead. In notebook after notebook, Anna begins to write portraits of these victims, creating lives and loves and identities for them and siphoning to them some of her personal grief. Through these acts of love for strangers, Anna slowly begins to build a connection to the world once more.

There had been a bomb in a distant market place. One of many bombs, the deaths caused by this event barely noticeable amongst the dreadful losses that filled the news every day. But a filament snagged and slowed the story down. Somehow that detail caught her; a market place, perhaps the most domestic public space there is. People shopping for food, plastic buckets, scarves, aluminium pans. Markets all over the world selling plastic buckets and aluminium pans. A place providing easy acquisition of the humbler tools of life; domestic wares, phone parts and gaudy cases, vinyl handbags, potatoes, eggs, cabbages. Mothers buying an evening meal, teenagers shopping for the excitingly new and obligingly affordable. A man buying a bucket so that he could clean his house. These ordinary people doing ordinary things, they would be the dead.

Allison’s background is as a visual artist, and it creeps through in her writing. For me the best passages occur when she is embracing her flair for the visual, and not just in the creation of a multitude of pen portraits of the victims. Consider the evocative imagery of how she introduces Anna: “She recognises her body – the dry of winter sits on her; her tall shape clings forlornly to long bones. She is mad, a scream frozen, sharpening the air around her as the frost has sharpened the ground under her feet”. Twice the Speed of Dark deals with difficult subject matter, and if you are not a fan of literary fiction you might not want to join Allison on this journey. I for one am glad I did, and I look forward to reading more from her in the future.

I received a copy of Twice the Speed of Dark from the author in exchange for an honest review. Find out more here. The blog tour continues…

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